Sunday, September 23, 2018

Sunday Morning Bonus Pulp: Weird Tales, November 1934


That's a Margaret Brundage cover, of course. What else could it be? And this issue is so packed with stories that Robert E. Howard, H.P. Lovecraft, and August Derleth don't even make the cover. E. Hoffmann Price, Paul Ernst, and Kirk Mashburn are still remembered today, but I doubt if S. Gordon Gurwit is exactly a household name. I don't know that I've ever read anything by him. Still, his work was popular during that era, because I've seen his name on numerous pulp covers. Anyway, with issues like this, it's easy to see why WEIRD TALES is such an iconic pulp magazine.

6 comments:

Walker Martin said...

WEIRD TALES has been a long time favorite with me and I used to have a complete set. But since I consider the 1923-1924 issues almost unreadable, I now have only the issues from 1925-1954.

Unfortunately it looks like the magazine is dead at present. I stress "at present" because it always seems to rise from the dead. However it has been four years since the latest issue in 2014.

Chap O'Keefe said...

As always, an insightful comment, Walker. Personally, I considered the latest reincarnation of what James rightly describes as an iconic pulp something of a disgrace from its short-lived start. But I won't revisit that here. You can read about it in the inroduction to the Amazon Kindle ebook WITCHERY: A DUO OF WEIRD TALES.

Kurt Reichenbaugh said...

I have that cover story "Queen of the Lilin" in an E. Hoffman Price anthology called Far Lands Other Days that I picked up years ago. Now I'll have to read it again, since I can't remember reading it before. Love that cover!

Keith West said...

A Brundage cover is always a good way to start the day.

James Reasoner said...

I have a copy of Price's FAR LANDS, OTHER DAYS. About 30 years ago, I read a copy that I got through interlibrary loan, and then two or three years ago when I came across a copy that wasn't took expensive, I bought it to read again. So far I haven't gotten around to it, but I hope I will. I remember I thought it was a great collection.

Keith West said...

I picked up my copy of FAR LANDS, OTHER DAYS at Half-Price Books. It was part of the L. Sprague de Camp library that they had gotten after de Camp's death. When I got it home and looked at it more closely, there was an entire page in the front that Price had inscribed to de Camp. Apparently, whoever evaluated the books in the collection missed that page, or it would have been with the really pricey items under lock and key. I haven't read that copy, but the book (minus the illustrations) is available in electronic form.